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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

2 edition of Black stain root disease of conifers found in the catalog.

Black stain root disease of conifers

Richard S. Smith

Black stain root disease of conifers

by Richard S. Smith

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service in [Washington] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Conifers -- Diseases and pests -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 4.

    StatementRichard S. Smith and David Graham.
    SeriesForest pest leaflet ; 145, General technical report NE -- 145.
    ContributionsGraham, David A., United States. Forest Service.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination4 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17515798M

    Drought Stress in Conifers; Elongate hemlock scale; Fall Webworm; Fir Engraver Beetle; Flatheaded fir borer; Forest Disease Management Notes: Annosus Root and Butt Rot; Forest Disease Management Notes: Armillaria Root Rot; Forest Disease Management Notes: Black Stain Root Disease; Forest Disease Management Notes: Elytroderma Needle Blight. Brown patches in conifers can be caused by a number of reasons. Pests or diseases are responsible for some cases, but others may be caused by growing conditions or routine operations such as trimming. Brown patches can develop anywhere within the hedge, varying in size from cm (½-1in) to m (ft). Patches develop most commonly in the.

    [Cf. FA 24, ] Aerial surveys and subsequent ground checks in showed that black stain root disease caused by Verticicladiella wagenerii occurred in Pinus edulis stands in western Colorado but not E. of the Continental Divide. In Colorado the disease seems to be virtually restricted to P. edulis although one case was recorded on P. by: 5.   Red root and butt rot of conifers, Plates , p. Brown root and butt rot of conifers, Plate p. Laminated root rots of conifers, Plate p. Root and butt rots caused by Inonotus dryadeus and Oxyporus latemarginatus, Plate p. Ganoderma root and butt rots and trunk decay, Plates p. Overview: p. Format: Hardcover.

    Attacks hardwoods and conifers - Armillaria attacks hardwoods and softwoods and kills shrubs, vines, and forbs in every is pervasive in North America, commercially destructive, a major cause of oak decline. The Armillaria sp. can kill trees that are already weakened by competition, other pests, or climatic factors. A characteristic symptom is a dark brown to black stain in the sapwood of roots, root crown and the lower stem (Smith ). Bark beetles often are involved in actually killing disease-weakened trees (Goheen & Cobb Jr ). The fungus: Conidiophores up to µm long and 4—12 µm wide at the base, up yo septate, mid- to dark brown.


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Black stain root disease of conifers by Richard S. Smith Download PDF EPUB FB2

Black stain root disease is thought to be native to western coniferous forests. Although the disease was first discovered infurther spread went virtually undetected until the s. Tree mortality associated with Black Stain Root Disease of Conifers Paul F. Hessburg, Donald J.

Goheen, and Robert V. Bega the disease was often mistakenlyat. Black-stain root disease is a vascular wilt restricted to conifers of western North America.

It infects roots and can move some distance up the base of the stem. It. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Get this from a library. Black stain root disease of conifers. [Paul F Hessburg; D J Goheen; Robert V Bega; United States. Forest Service.]. Black stain root disease is distinguished from other root diseases by the dark-brown to purple-black discoloration in the sapwood of the lower bole and root collar.

When observed in cross section, the black stain appears in arcs roughly concentric with the growth rings. Black stain root disease, like all other diseases caused by ophiostomatoid fungi, is associated with insect transmission (Hansen et al.

Two root weevils (Pissodes fasciatus LeConte, J.L. Distribution: Since the first report of black stain root disease in B.C. inthis problem has been reported from many areas in the southern interior and coastal forests.

Identification: Crown symptoms in trees infected by L. wageneri are difficult to. Black snow mold (conifers) See brown felt blight Black stain root disease (conifers) Ceratocystis wageneri Bleeding conk (conifers) Haematostereum sanguinolentum Bleeding stereum (conifers) Haematostereum sanguinolentum Blister rust (white pines) See white pine blister rust Non-pathogenic brooms occasional on Pacific Coast trees Blue brooms.

Phytophthora root rot of conifers is caused by fungi in the genus Phytophthora. Many species of fir, true cedars, white-cedar (arborvitae), larch, pine, spruce, yew and Douglas-fir are affected.

It produces a swimming spore called a zoospore. Symptoms and Diagnosis. Black stain was Montana. present in eight of 20 declining or DISCUSSION symptomless windthrown trees near the Black stain root disease of Douglas-fir margins of the centers.

Neither A. mellea has been reported in California (3), LITERATURE CITED nor black stain was detected in the roots Oregon (), and Washington (4,5). Recognition: Dark-brown to purple-black stain in the sapwood of roots, root crowns, and lower stems are especially diagnos-tic.

Growth reduction, foliage yellowing, distress cone crops, basal resinosis, rapid decline, death; symptoms may begin on one side of the tree.

Disease Spread: Occurs in stands with a large component of. Compendium of Conifer Diseases, Second Edition, describes more than diseases and disorders of conifers in these major sections: The Introduction provides background on the botany and diseases of conifers, up-to-date information on climate change and fungal taxonomy, and a comprehensive list of both classic and current publications about.

The metabolites produced when a Verticicladiella species (Canadian Forestry Service strain C), the causative agent of the black stain root disease. Black stain root disease (BSRD) is a native root disease affecting several species across the West, but attacks mainly Douglas-fir in western Oregon.

Foresters are aware of several “hot spots” where the disease has been particularly active in recent years, and there is concern that it might be expanding. Since the first report of black stain root disease in B.C.

inthis problem has been reported from many areas in the southern interior and coastal forests. Damage, symptoms and biology In the interior, up to 50% of the trees have been killed in some lodgepole pine stands years of age; infection of Douglas-fir and spruce is less common.

However, little is known of the effects of these silvicultural treatments on incidence of black stain root disease on sites with high disease risk. Because the woody root feeding insects that vector the disease respond to disturbance (Otrosina – Ferrell ), understanding consequences of different disturbances resulting from silvicultural Cited by: 2.

"Diseases of Trees and Shrubs is by far the best book currently available for the horticulturist, arborist, or forester who wishes to identify disorders of forest and shade trees and woody ornamentals."—The Public Garden Black stain root disease of conifers Ceratocystis cankers Having used the original book as a disease bible a Brand: Cornell University Press.

Diseases of Cones and Seeds Hemlock cone rust Hericium abietis (Weir ex Hubert) K. Harrison—6 (syn. Hydnum abietis Weir ex Hubert) Melampsora abietis-canadensis C. Ludw. ex Arthur—2, 3 M. farlowii (Arthur) Davis—2, 3 Disease with Insect Vectors Black stain root disease Leptographium.

wageneri—2. Black stain (Leptographium wageneri) hosts: lodggp,epole, pp,onderosa, ppy,inyon, Douglas‐fir, white fir, western white pine spreads via root to root contact, or by root feeding weevils or bark beetles can be a problem in disturbed sites and/or on stressed trees.

Root disease Chapter 12 in your book pp Readings for next week Slaughter and Rizzo Past forest management promoted root disease in Yosemite valley.

California Agriculture 53(3): Dickman, A. Plant Pathogens and Long-Term Ecosystem Changes, in G. Carrol, and D. Wicklow, eds.). Conifers is an extremely thorough and well-illustrated book that will be a great asset to landscape architects and horticulturists.

-- Landscape Journal This is a scrumptious atlas for all lovers of gymnosperms. -- Taxon, August Cited by: 7. Black stain root disease of conifers Ceratocystis cankers "Diseases of Trees and Shrubs is by far the best book currently available for the horticulturist, arborist, or forester who wishes to identify disorders of forest and shade trees and woody ornamentals." Having used the original book as a disease bible a gazillion times, this Pages: blackstain root disease.

This must be interpreted with caution because by chance, the assigned treatment on these plots happened to be on soils not favorable for black stain root disease development.

There may be a correlation between certain soil series, vegetation types, and occurrence of the disease (Kliejunas – Otrosina ).Cited by: 2.